One Caw, Two Caws …

Carrion crows are not known for their beauty or love of song. But they have more than their share of smarts. Now, researchers have figured out that these birds can vocally count to four, according to a new study published in Science. “Our results show that humans are...

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The Genome Olympics

Being big and complex doesn’t necessarily translate to having the largest amount of genetic material. Case in point: A new study has found that a small, humble fern growing in the forests of a South Pacific island has a genome that is 50 times larger than...

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Woolly Luxury

Muslims around the world are celebrating the holiday of Eid al-Adha this week to commemorate the Prophet Ibrahim’s willingness to sacrifice his son, Ismail, as an act of obedience to God. The celebration generally involves the slaughter and consumption of sheep, so the animals are in...

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Accident-Prone

In 2013, a meteor fell to Earth in Siberia, injuring more than 1,000 people and causing more than $33 million in damage to infrastructure. Though this type of event is rare, asteroids present the biggest risk to planets. Now, scientists have found that Mars is even...

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Baby-Boost

Living creatures who carry fetuses to term experience an energy spike, long thought to be caused by the fetus. But now, a team of Australian researchers found that it is the bearer’s own body that demands such high amounts of energy, according to a new study. While...

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The Missing Sarcophagi

In 2009, archeologists Ayman Daramany and Kevin Cahail discovered a fragment of a granite sarcophagus beneath the floor of a Coptic monastery in Abydos, an ancient city in central Egypt. After intensive study, they realized that the sarcophagus bore the cartouche of the High Priest...

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The Great Replacement

Bronze cuckoos annoy other birds. Too lazy, perhaps, to build their own nests, they lay their eggs in the carefully constructed homes of small songbirds. When the cuckoo egg hatches, the chick then pushes the host bird’s eggs out of the nest and tricks the new...

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A Big Cousin

There once walked (and swam) a giant thunderbird in Australia, standing more than eight feet tall and weighing about 36 stone (504 lbs or 228 kg). Scientists had long thought the extinct animal, Genyornis newtoni, was an ancestor of emus and ostriches. But in the 1990s,...

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An Ancient Fight

Modern medicine has come a long way in its fight against cancer. Now, a new study shows how this fight actually began more than 4,000 years ago. This battle’s ancient beginnings were uncovered by a research team recently after it studied the skulls of two individuals...

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The Mystery of Feathers

Most depictions of dinosaurs feature the fearsome creatures with scaly skin – but that wasn’t always the case. Instead, recent discoveries show that some dinosaurs such as the vicious velociraptor sported feathers. In fact, the prevailing scientific consensus is that modern birds descended from members of...

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Alive and Furious

Earth’s neighbor, Venus, is not “dead” – at least in terms of volcanism, a new study revealed. Recent re-analyses of data collected by NASA’s Magellan spacecraft in the 1990s unveiled compelling evidence of ongoing volcanic activity on Venus. “Using these maps as a guide, our results show...

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A Yawning Bond

Yawning is catchy – and even man’s best friend is not immune. For example, wolves have been shown to pass yawns from one another in a phenomenon known as “contagious yawning”. Horses do, too, but it occurs differently in dogs. Different studies have found that pooches are...

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The Missing River

Archaeologists have long wondered how the ancient Egyptians moved the massive materials they used to build the pyramids. “Many of us who are interested in ancient Egypt are aware that the Egyptians must have used a waterway to build their enormous monuments … but nobody was...

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Going Global

German cockroaches are master travelers: These days, despite their name, they are literally everywhere – on every continent but Antarctica. But because they lack a natural habitat, scientists have not been able to figure out where they actually came from. Recently, however, researchers began tracking how the...

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Ready for Battle

In 1960, archaeologists found body armor in the village of Dendra, near what was once the ancient Greek city of Mycenae, with a helmet clad with boars’ tusks and a suit consisting of bronze plates. While it appeared quite sturdy, archaeologists wondered whether Mycenaean soldiers used...

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The Tree of Life

It’s the iconic image of Africa – a giant, lonely tree on a grassy plain with its almost manicured green crown. This tree, the baobab, also known as the “Tree of Life” or the “Upside-Down Tree,” because of its root-like crown, has fascinated scientists and artists...

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Truth in Teeth

Cavemen, it turns out, ate their veggies, too, a new study shows. Long thought to mainly subsist on a protein-based diet, researchers have found that the Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers who lived 15,000 years ago in what is now Morocco actually ate more vegetables than meat. In fact, these Late...

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Shaping Emotions

Beluga whales are known as the “canaries of the sea” because of their chattiness, expressed through whistles, chirps and squeals. But now, a new study has found that they also express themselves using a squishy bump on their foreheads known as “melon.” In essence, as Science News...

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