Waterhole Routes

The Toba super-eruption 74,000 years ago left a lake 62 miles long and 1,600 feet deep in Indonesia, a testament to the largest known natural disaster in the last 2.5 million years – its effects were felt around the globe. For decades, the common belief has...

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Earth Time

Global warming is widely credited for causing ice to melt at both the Earth’s poles, leading to a rise in sea levels. And that in turn is shifting water, causing our planet to spin more slowly, Scientific American reported. Combined with other forces that alter Earth’s rotation...

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Canine Canny

Many dog owners swear their pooches understand them. Now, a new groundbreaking study shows they actually might. The research suggests that canines possess a more sophisticated understanding of human language than previously recognized, the Los Angeles Times reported. To arrive at that conclusion, neuroscientist Marianna Boros and her...

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Blood in the Soil

A new genetic analysis is shedding new light on the ancestral lineage and enduring presence of North America’s Blackfoot Indigenous peoples, Science Magazine reported. Conducted collaboratively by a team of geneticists and Blackfoot community members, the study provided further support to Indigenous oral traditions and archeological...

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Four Eyes

Most spiders have more than two eyes – but not daddy longlegs. These basement-dwelling arachnids – which are technically not spiders – are known to have only two forward-facing peepers. However, this wasn’t always the case, the Smithsonian Magazine reported. Daddy longlegs belong to an arachnid group known...

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Scoring Genius

Is talent innate? According to an analysis of Ludwig van Beethoven’s DNA, not so much. Scientists reviewed the famed German composer’s genetics and found a low predisposition for beat synchronization, Science Alert reported. Beat synchronization is the ability to recognize and keep up with rhythm, which previous...

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Speed Racer

Shark skin has captivated both fishermen and scientists in how it enables the marine predators to achieve astonishing speeds underwater. Packed with small, anvil-shaped structures known as denticles, some species can swim at speeds topping 43 miles per hour – far outpacing Olympic swimmers who might...

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Hard Headed

Scientists recently unveiled a global archive containing records and specimens of more than 4,400 preserved human brains, dating back several millennia, Newsweek reported. These brains, sourced from 213 unique locations across the world, range from approximately 12,000 years old to as recent as the 20th century. Led...

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Artificial Enhancers

Scientists recently employed artificial intelligence (AI) to refine the flavors of Belgian beers and enhance their quality, the Guardian reported, attempting to dissect the intricate relationships that motivate human aroma perception. In their paper, lead researcher Kevin Verstrepen and his team analyzed the chemical composition of...

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Hairy Camper

Entomologist James Tweed came across the hairy insect by accident while camping in the rainforests of Australia’s Queensland. He initially thought it was bird poo, Popular Science reported. The mysterious beetle puzzled Tweed and his colleagues because there was no scientific record of such a species. In...

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All Work, All Play

Research has shown that play is vital for the young chimpanzee’s physical and psychological development. Great apes, such as gorillas and bonobos, engage in some form of play, too, such as tickling, joking and chasing each other. But during periods of food scarcity, chimps usually tone...

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Snake Puffs

Too much meat isn’t good for the planet or for human health, researchers say, so the hunt is on for alternatives. Ostriches, alligators and insects have been sneaking their way onto menus. Now, a recent study has proposed that snake meat could be a sustainable replacement for...

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Got Milk?

Many mammals feed their young with milk – amphibians and other creatures, not so much. Now, Brazilian biologists have discovered a species of amphibian feeding its offspring a milk-like secretion rich in nutrients, NPR reported. In their study, they explained that the worm-like amphibian is a caecilian,...

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Inhale, Exhale

Some individuals, to blow off steam, go for a run. Unfortunately, researchers now say that it is counter-productive in dealing with anger, New Atlas reported. In their study, they addressed a psychoanalytic theory popularized by Sigmund Freud called ‘catharsis,’ which calls for physical and verbal expressions to...

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Sweeping in the Season

It’s officially spring, which means it’s time to break out the mops and dusters in that annual modern ritual that fills many with dread: The spring clean. Turns out, ancient humans did this, too, according to National Geographic. One of the earliest known references to spring cleaning...

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Falling on the Moon

Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, is known for its tangerine-colored skies and nearly six million square miles of large, dark dunes that cover its surface. Some of them are as big as the massive dunes found on Earth, but how they formed has been a topic of...

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Gut-wrenching

Modern life in cities has eroded the human gut’s ability to digest fibers from plant matter, Science Alert reported. In 2003, scientists discovered that the human gut could digest the fibers in plant matter via a bacterium capable of breaking down cellulose. This compound, the most...

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Tapping Into a Mystery

In a riveting dance of deception, poison dart frogs tap their toes faster than renowned tap dancers Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire. Scientists, however, aren’t sure why, the New York Times reported. A recent study by biologists at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign observed dyeing poison dart...

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A Rainbow of Wine

In ancient Rome, the wine flowed freely. Now, new research has uncovered what it might have tasted like, Smithsonian Magazine reported. Researchers Dimitri Van Limbergen and Paulina Komar found that Roman wine boasted a spicy taste, with tones of toasted bread, apples, roasted walnuts, and even curry...

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Tool Stories

Archaeologists recently discovered the oldest evidence of human ancestors in Europe at a site in western Ukraine dating back 1.4 million years, Cosmos Magazine reported. Hominins – a group that includes humans and their extinct relatives – are believed to have first arrived in Eurasia from...

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